Three large community pastures in SW Saskatchewan closer to protection

Posted by on 8. September 2020 in Conservation, News & Events | 0 comments

Great conservation news: Canadian (federal) and Saskatchewan governments officially announced a formal land exchange of three former PFRA community pastures: Nashlyn, Govenlock and Battle Creek. The agreement between the Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture will enable the federal and provincial governments to work together with local ranching and Indigenous communities to preserve Saskatchewan’s native grassland ecosystem. ECCC will manage the three pastures for the conservation of species at risk and migratory birds, while continuing with sustainable cattle grazing.

Prairie at Battle Creek community pasture. Consul, Saskatchewan

Native prairie at Battle Creek community pasture. Consul, Saskatchewan

Combined, the three pastures cover an area of 800 square kilometres of predominantly native prairie, in the most biodiverse portion of Saskatchewan. The area provides habitat for 10 species at risk including swift fox, Sprague’s pipit, chestnut-collared longspur, McCown’s longspur, greater sage grouse, burrowing owl, ferruginous hawk, mountain plover, long-billed curlew and northern leopard frog. Less than 13% of prairie habitat remains in Saskatchewan, and any effort to manage the land to benefit species that are in serious decline is welcome. 
Sunset over prairie at Govenlock community pasture. Consul, Saskatchewan

Sunset over prairie at Govenlock community pasture. Consul, Saskatchewan

Combined, the three pastures cover an area of 800 square kilometres of predominantly native prairie, in the most biodiverse portion of Saskatchewan. The area provides habitat for 10 species at risk including swift fox, Sprague’s pipit, chestnut-collared longspur, McCown’s longspur, greater sage grouse, burrowing owl, ferruginous hawk, mountain plover, long-billed curlew and northern leopard frog. Less than 13% of prairie habitat remains in Saskatchewan, and any effort to manage the land to benefit species that are in serious decline is welcome. 
Male greater sage grouse displaying on breeding grounds.

Male greater sage grouse displaying on breeding grounds.

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