Posts Tagged "animal"

Loons of Anglin Lake

Posted by on 28. June 2014 in Blog / Journal, Photography | 7 comments

Loons of Anglin Lake

Two weeks ago I had a chance to photograph Common Loons on Anglin Lake in northern Saskatchewan. A good friend of mine, Bradley Muir has been conducting loon surveys for the last 4 years as part of the Canadian Lakes Loon Survey. Bird Studies Canada is coordinating the surveys, and also analyzes and reports on the collected data. Brad invited me to join him and try to photograph the loons in his part of the woods. There is something special about loons of Anglin Lake. Many Canadian lakes host Common Loons and you can hear their characteristic call throughout the country. However, according to long-term studies published by Bird Studies Canada, Anglin Lake has more than 14 times higher population density of loons compared to records from any other Canadian lake of similar size. Loons of Anglin Lake also have almost 30 times as many large young. Over the tenure of loon surveys, between 30 and 44 breeding pairs have been observed on the lake. Brad recorded 38 pairs this year. One beautiful Saturday evening, Brad, myself and Andrea Nelson who has been helping with the surveys, headed on the lake in a small boat generously provided by the Land of the Loon Resort. Breeding season has been delayed this year and pairs of loons were still hanging out on the open water. Winds was calm and I was able to capture a few good images of loons feeding and displaying. Tranquility in this part of boreal forest was sometimes interrupted by a roar of speed boats pulling a skier. With a loud music blasting, some boats create a considerable wake and disturbance which represent a threat to the nesting loons. Chick feeding and other parenting duties are likely disrupted during periods of heavy human use. Disturbance to birds is likely to increase; Anglin Lake has been included in the newly created Great Blue Heron Provincial Park. Enjoyment of the lake by a nearby cottage community and needs of loons will have to reconciled in the upcoming park management plan. If you are interested in observing and photographing loons and other wildlife in the boreal forest of northern Saskatchewan, Bradley is running Loon Country Excursions. To find out more, check out the Sundogs Excursions web site or call 306-960-1654. Before you decide to go, be aware that Brad can not guarantee loon photography as the excursions are operated to prevent undue disturbance to all wildlife. If animals choose to keep their distance, participants can still enjoy their presence, listen to the iconic calls, and focus their binoculars and cameras on magnificent boreal forest and lakes....

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Horse in pasture with sagebrush, Val Marie PFRA Community Pasture

Posted by on 7. July 2013 in Saskatchewan | Comments Off on Horse in pasture with sagebrush, Val Marie PFRA Community Pasture

Horse in pasture with sagebrush, Val Marie PFRA Community Pasture

I spent several hours photographing a group on horses near the Val Marie PFRA community pasture headquarters. This horse decided to run through a field of sagebrush to catch up with his buddies. Val Marie PFRA is the largest community pasture in Saskatchewan, containing over 41,256 hectares (101,946 acres) of magnificent native prairie. Frenchman River flows through the pasture, with rugged valley slopes adding to it’s photographic appeal. Together with the adjacent Beaver Valley PFRA pasture, there are over 200,000 acres (80,000 hectares) of un-interrupted native prairie. Something that even the nearby Grasslands National Park can not match. Return to the Saskatchewan photo...

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Male Northern Shoveler, Wanuskewin Park

Posted by on 30. December 2012 in Wanuskewin Park | Comments Off on Male Northern Shoveler, Wanuskewin Park

Male Northern Shoveler, Wanuskewin Park

Male Northern Shoveler displaying, Wanuskewin Park. This dabbling duck species is unmistakable due to its large spoon-like bill. They feed by dabbling for plant food, often by swinging its bill from side to side and using the bill to strain food from the water. Small, comb-like structures on the edge of the bill act like sieves, allowing the bird to filter the food particle from the water surface. Males are very colourful, with iridescent dark green head and brightly red coloured body. I observed this male occasionally flapping its wings and waited for a right moment to capture the image. Water was of a very similar colour thanks to the reflection of dry reeds in the background (I was slightly raised from the water surface and managed to avoid capturing any of the confusing background vegetation). Back to the Wanuskewin Heritage Park photo...

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Solitary Canada Goose at Wanuskewin

Posted by on 28. December 2012 in Wanuskewin Park | Comments Off on Solitary Canada Goose at Wanuskewin

Solitary Canada Goose at Wanuskewin

Solitary Canada Goose on the banks of Opimihaw Creek. Canada Geese nest in the vicinity of Wanuskewin and can be seen almost all year round (except in the middle of winter when any open water and South Saskatchewan River are frozen solid) . I photographed this goose in early May along the Opimihaw creek running through the park. Vegetation was still brown and I like how brown shoots of grass frame the bird. Back to the Wanuskewin Heritage Park photo gallery....

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Richardson’s ground squirrel at Wanuskewin

Posted by on 26. December 2012 in Wanuskewin Park | Comments Off on Richardson’s ground squirrel at Wanuskewin

Richardson’s ground squirrel at Wanuskewin

Richardson ground squirrel at Wanuskewin Heritage Park, Saskatoon Better known under the common name ‘gopher’, ground squirrels were named after the Scottish naturalist Sir John Richardson. They prefer prairie habitat with short grass so they can betters see predators. And there are many: coyotes, foxes, hawks. This fellow had a burrow right beside the Wanuskewing Park interpretive centre. I placed my tripod downhill from where the animal was grazing, to be able to take the image at the same level. When photographing small critters, whether they are animals or children, they look much better if you bring the camera to their level. Back to the Wanuskewin Heritage Park photo...

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