Posts Tagged "winter"

Snow falling on elm trees

Posted by on 31. March 2015 in Blog / Journal, Photography | Comments Off on Snow falling on elm trees

Snow falling on elm trees

With record high springtime temperatures in Saskatoon, it is easy to forget that not so long ago we had a few intense snow storms. Although, nothing like what friends in the Atlantic Canada had to deal with. During one heavy snowfall, I took advantage of a lunch break to snap a few images on the University of Saskatchewan campus. It is tricky to capture small crystals so I decided to use a telephoto lens (200 mm) to compress the space and enhance the soft effect of falling snow flakes. If you are familiar with the U of S campus, I walked around the Bowl until I found a nice location across the Biology building. I pointed the camera at a spot where elm trees created a compositional frame, and waited for an interesting subject (or subjects) to walk by. It was a quiet afternoon and it took a lot of patience to wait for someone wearing a brightly coloured jacket.     If you are familiar with the colour theory, colours have certain intensity or “strength” value. Less intense colours (like blue or violet) have a calming effect. More intense colours (like red or yellow) are often used as highlights because they attract our attention. If you assign a numerical value to colour strength, yellow would have a value of 9, followed by an orange (8), red and green (6), blue (4), violet (3) etc. Conversely, the area needed to be covered by a particular colour to make up for the lack of strength shrinks from violet to yellow. Red or yellow are “strong” colours so they only need to appear in a small area of our image to attract attention. Hence, try to incorporate small patches of red or yellow within the frame to add some interest.     Once I had enough of playing with colours, I started looking for patterns and shapes in the landscape. The University of Saskatchewan, with numerous building graced by beautiful stone masonry, offers a perfect environment to practice your photography composition skills. Diagonal lines, curves, frames within frames, it is all there. Here is a sample photograph of a building near Place Riel.     Next time bad weather comes your way, grab the camera and head outdoors – there are treasures to be found in those snowflakes falling on elm trees....

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From the Winter Photography Workshop

Posted by on 31. March 2013 in Blog / Journal, Workshops | Comments Off on From the Winter Photography Workshop

From the Winter Photography Workshop

It is so nice to be able to sit down, pick up the papers and enjoy a cup of freshly brewed coffee. I finished my last class and now catching up with a lot of things that were put on hold while I worked on school assignments. Here are a few images from the 2013 Winter Photography Workshop at the Ancient Spirals Retreat. The weather was great; just below freezing and hardly any wind. Lots of fresh snow with interesting patterns. As a bonus, the cloud cover cleared at the end of the day and we were able to photograph the fool moon raising behind a character windmill not far from the retreat. The black & white version of the windmill image was was created in post-processing using Nik Silver Efex Pro. The close-up image of the windmill with full moon in the background is a composite of two images taken with a 400 mm lens. Because of a narrow dept of field recorded with this long telephoto lens, I took two consecutive images. For the first image I focused the lens on the windmill and for the second on the moon. The two images were then blended in post-processing.    ...

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New half-day photography workshops

Posted by on 19. February 2013 in Blog / Journal, Workshops | Comments Off on New half-day photography workshops

New half-day photography workshops

I will be leading a series of half-day photography workshops in the Saskatoon area, suitable for novice and intermediate level photographers. The idea is to have a short informative lecture on various topics and then go out in the field and practice what we have learned. Dates and topics: Sunday, 24. February 2013 – Winter Photography Saturday, 25. May 2013 – Macro and Flower Photography Sunday, 21. July 2013 – Landscape Photography and Basic Digital Workflow Check out the Saskatoon photo workshops page for more information. Also, I am preparing several photo tours to my favourite places in Saskatchewan this year. More information will be posted soon. Here are the dates: Grasslands National Park (June 7-9, 2013) Great Sand Hills (July 5-7, 2013) Prince Albert National Park  (September 20-22, 2013)...

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Winter on the prairies – Grasslands National Park

Posted by on 31. December 2012 in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan | Comments Off on Winter on the prairies – Grasslands National Park

Winter on the prairies – Grasslands National Park

Snow-covered hills in Frenchman River Valley – West Block of Grasslands National Park. This photograph was taken after a late spring snow storm south of the old Larson’s homestead (this is an older image from the archives). Friends told me that they got a “lot of snow” in Val Marie so I went south and spent a weekend photographing in the park. It does not looks much, but for this (very dry) part of Saskatchewan, any moisture is received with joy. Back to the Grasslands National Park photo...

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Northern Lights at Saskatchewan Landing Provincial Park

Posted by on 2. December 2012 in Blog / Journal | 2 comments

Northern Lights at Saskatchewan Landing Provincial Park

While driving to Swift Current one cold and clear November night I noticed an amazing display of Northern Lights appearing above the horizon.  I just passed the town of Kyle and could not find an interesting feature on the landscape to use as a foreground for images. I continued my trip south to the Saskatchewan Landing Provincial Park, knowing that there are rugged hills adjacent to the highway and a curve in the road that could be used as a leading line and aid in composition. I left the car at the Goodwin House parking lot and started photographing along the highway edge.     After capturing a  few images, I decided to move further away from the Goodwin House as snow-covered hills lit by the parking lot lights appeared too bright and did not balance well with the Aurora display. Walking up the  hill I found a spot where a curve in the highway fit just right for the composition I had envisioned. Images you see here were captured with a 17 mm lens at ISo 1600, 30 second exposure (that is why stars appear as short bright lines).       Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis)  are caused by the collision of charged particles with atoms in the high altitude atmosphere and are modified by the Earth’s magnetic field. The light display could last from only a few minutes to several hours. The constantly shifting display of lights that I saw that nights was very powerful and lasted for a long time. I photographed the Aurora from 1 a.m. to 3 a.m. and continued my trip to Swift Current well before it...

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